Author Topic: LEGO ao sol  (Read 4005 times)

Offline AVCampos

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LEGO ao sol
« on: 14 May 2012, 12:01:43 pm »
Obrigado à Cassiebsg por lembrar que havia este secção para colocar a pergunta!



Qual é a cor de peças que a LEGO recomenda para se estragar o mínimo possível em condições de calor e luz solar directa? Nomeadamente, estou a pensar no tablier de um automóvel.



What is the element colour LEGO recommends for getting the least damaged by conditions of direct sunlight and heat? Specifically, I'm thinking of a car's dashboard.

Offline AlexandreRibeiro

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Re: LEGO ao sol
« Reply #1 on: 14 May 2012, 14:32:06 pm »
Alguém colocou uma questão parecida no Linkedin (como é que a Lego protege as esculturas de exterior do Sol?).

transcrevo aqui a pergunta e as respostas:

Does anyone know how LEGO protects their outside sculptures from fading due to sun exposure? Or do any of you have suggesions on how to preserve the color?

I haven't built anything for outdoors yet, but I am in the planning stage to try. My assumption is that after exposure to the sun the colors will eventually fade. Any ideas on how to prevent this?

Mário Ferreira • I think impossible. Construction on the outside only by applying a varnish or a similar product.

Mariann Asanuma • Its pretty much impossible to prevent it from fading. At LEGOLAND they put a clear UV coat on the models, but even then the color starts fading after 6-12 months. And then the UV coat starts to peel off. So it starts looking pretty ragged after about a year. Also some colors like orange and medium blue fade even faster than others. The fading is not consistent between bricks, as different lots of bricks fade at different rates.

Even if you have the model indoors and not in direct sunlight some colors like white will yellow. And that's not consistent between bricks either, so you'll have a mix of yellowed bricks and unyellowed white bricks.

There's really nothing you can do about it.

The way that LEGOLAND keeps the models longer is that they refurbish the model by sandblasting the models with a fine walnut shell dust. It takes off the thin layer of brick that has become discolored. The only bricks that this doesn't work on are the clear and trans color bricks as they get sun throughout the part.

Tommy Armstrong • They do try to limit the amount of fading , or rather extend the life of the pieces by applying a clear UV resistant coat to them. But colors will fade when exposed to UV light.. It has never made any sense to me whatsoever that they or anyone would have LEGO sculptures outside when a simple roof or tent structrue would not, if designed well, impact the joy of the experience.Would actually enhance it on hot or rainy days. Like an aviary for example. Mariann knows what she is talking about. There are some varnishes that will help, but the very nature of a protective coating is to absorb the UV energy and prevent it from getting to the substrate. In clear coats they work by sacrifically absorbing the UV energy. Think about deck varnishes and stains used outside. You have to constantly keep recoating. Sign painters use a clear coat over their painted signs to protect them for a period of time, and I actually used it over most of my printed bricks not only to protect the color from fading but to help prevent the natural yellowing of ABS. I would actually recommend to spray it on all sculptures that were going to be permanent. And indside would probably workd to make them good for many, many years. Ron-Glo UV Absorber works well for me. It is solvent based and they make a latex one also, but adhesion flow and applicaction characteristics not as good. You can thin it ou nicely just the way you want it with simple mineral spiriits. Can even spray it onto modesl using pre-val spay cans. It csould give you an extra 50 or more years inside and 2 or three outside protecttion. Although I am probably going to get slammed for saying so, I would coat all my models with it if knew would not be taken apart. But the answer is NO--nothing you can do will keep LEGO from fading in UV light. It is simply a law of chemistry. I wish I had coated my son's starwars models of years ago as they probably would not have yellowed as they have.

Beware however fo clear coats that contain high powre solvents as they will "melt the bricks". That includes many spray can products also.

Tommy Armstrong • I am not really thinking about a full blown climate controlled enclosed structure, but more of a large shading structure or even a series of them. (trees work also and of course could be included--real ones and "artificial ones"). Lots of cool relatively inexpensive methods. Tension sturctures and inflatable ones, come to mind. If I was back in architecture school, it would be a great project for students. I remember going to the Inside Tour in Billund and we of course visited LegoLand--in fact stayed in it. It was cold and raining. The cold is not a problem, but the rain is --just a canopy would serve double duty of extending the life of the LEGO for decades and also providing protection from the elements for the visitors. Lots of neat design possibilities. Went to Calif and it was incredibly hot--but would have been fine with shade. The temp not really that bad, but sun was. Rain really not a problem there of course. My example of an arboretum not a good one as that is a climate controled sturcture. Was not thinking of that at all, just a large umbrella or series of them. Even a very cool space frame comes to mind simply stretched with a UV blocking translucent film would be great. Strong , light, and stable. And think of the things you could hang from it. those areas over the models and walkways would be covered, those over the water and grassy areas simply left to the sunlight and elements. I agree wholeheartedly that natural light is a must as is airiness. But UV filtered natural light is the best light of all. We recently opened a new multimillion dollar art museum in Raleigh, and uses all natural light and the paintings just take on a wonderful hue. But of course those skylights are made to block out the UV as you do not want priceless art fading. They only cut on the lights when overcast and raining. One could do some wonderful stuff with a them park canopy and still have an outdoors experience. And one has to remember there is no worse quality of light than that in the heigh of the day. That is why good photographers drink during that time or diffuse their light.

Johnny van der Klugt • When i worked in the Plastics Industry, the products where exposed to high UV to see the effect of time. Lego was one of the clients buying those top quality products. Some of the bricks that i have are nearly 40 years old, and still have the same color as the new ones.

Brandon Obert, PHR • Thanks everyone for your feedback. It's good to know how LEGO handles this issue and great to have a few ideas from your personal experience as well.

Alex O'Donnell • @ Tommy,

Yes, I fell into the trap of thinking of a large convention center type hall.

I believe Legoland CA could benefit from a few shaded areas, but not in the main Miniland, to stand looking down upon the spread that is Miniland is vista I would not wish obscured. The side exhibits, such as where the Star Wars exhibits are (formerly Cape Kennedy and Nascar exhibits) could stand a little extra shading.




Offline AVCampos

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Re: LEGO ao sol
« Reply #2 on: 14 May 2012, 14:59:15 pm »
(inserir aqui imagem do Neo a dizer "Whoa.") :o Não fazia ideia que já havia tanto debate sobre o assunto!

Já conhecia a técnica do revestimento anti-UV opcional para modelos ao ar livre, mas não da sua efemeridade... Seja como for, não me importo que o LEGO amareleça, pois tenciono usá-lo mais pela funcionalidade que pelo aspecto (como fiz com umas trancas anti-gato para a porta da sala lá em casa), mas, já que se pode escolher várias cores, gostava de saber quais as melhores e piores. Branco e trans-clear já conhecia, laranja não fazia ideia...

Offline AlexandreRibeiro

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Re: LEGO ao sol
« Reply #3 on: 14 May 2012, 16:09:23 pm »
Há aqui um Mário Ferreira envolvido. Alguém conhece?

Offline nunofilipe72

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Re: LEGO ao sol
« Reply #4 on: 14 May 2012, 18:18:52 pm »
Há aqui um Mário Ferreira envolvido. Alguém conhece?

Pode ser brasileiro !

Offline PocasNuckie

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Re: LEGO ao sol
« Reply #5 on: 14 May 2012, 18:20:47 pm »
Deve ser aquele empresário do Nourte que vai fazer um voo sub-orbital um dia destes ...

Pocas

Offline csiquet

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Re: LEGO ao sol
« Reply #6 on: 14 May 2012, 22:50:02 pm »
(inserir aqui imagem do Neo a dizer "Whoa.") :o Não fazia ideia que já havia tanto debate sobre o assunto!

Já conhecia a técnica do revestimento anti-UV opcional para modelos ao ar livre, mas não da sua efemeridade... Seja como for, não me importo que o LEGO amareleça, pois tenciono usá-lo mais pela funcionalidade que pelo aspecto (como fiz com umas trancas anti-gato para a porta da sala lá em casa), mas, já que se pode escolher várias cores, gostava de saber quais as melhores e piores. Branco e trans-clear já conhecia, laranja não fazia ideia...

O melhor é mesmo o preto. Não pode escurecer mais.  ;)

Aproveito o post para fazer um apelo.
Gostava de estudar a recuperação de peças amarelas de uma maneira um pouco mais científica.
Precisava portanto de peças que perderam as suas cores iniciais.
Se têm algumas esquecidas por aí, serão as bem-vindas

Offline Malha

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Re: LEGO ao sol
« Reply #7 on: 16 May 2012, 23:44:06 pm »
Há aqui um Mário Ferreira envolvido. Alguém conhece?

Pode ser brasileiro !


Sou Português! :clapping: :clapping:
Deve ser aquele empresário do Nourte que vai fazer um voo sub-orbital um dia destes ...

Pocas

Se fosse ....  tanto Lego que comprava, mas isto no Sul o € não chega, mas vai dando.... :whistle: :whistle: